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Wisdom Diversity: By Tanzanian Student Rehema Nyandwi

Rehema Nyandwi

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The United States of America has always been a nation of immigrants from all over the world. Meet new Wisdom HS student Rehema Nyandwi from Tanzania, who was born in Congo. Nyandwi shared the comparison between Tanzanian and American education.
Unlike in Tanzania, tuition for education is free here in the USA, except for the taxes that residents pay. Students can get free education there, but it won’t be taken serious by the government and there won’t be job offerings for the students after they finish. The only way to get a free education in Tanzania, is if you are living in a refugee camp.
“When I was in Tanzania, sometimes my parents couldn’t afford to pay my school fees, so I had to miss school days and I would fall behind on my education,” said Nyandwi.
When parents can’t afford to pay the school fees, students simply do not attend school in Tanzania. In the United States, kids receive a free education from elementary until 12th grade, where they learn science, math, language arts, and other classes. Another difference is that in Tanzania, school work is very difficult – significantly more difficult.
“When I got here, I felt like I was free and my parents didn’t have to suffer, so that I could get an education,” said Nyandwi. “It just got easier for me and my family, even though I had a hard time trying to catch up with the language and every subject that they are teaching here.”
At Wisdom HS, students take four classes a day with different subjects, but in Tanzania four different subjects are taught in one classroom, by one teacher. There is a great emphasis placed on their education system and how it works to grow the abilities of the future generation. The government dedicates time to education, it is taken very seriously.
It was hard for Nyandwi to get used to her new environment here in the United States, but she had to learn. The good thing is that she came here when she was 11 years old, when she had just completed elementary school in Tanzania, which made it a little easier for her to get accustomed to things. 

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